Monday, November 12, 2012

Living Voices - Memories of Jewish War Veterans



Jersey Shore Jewish War Veterans (JWV) Post 125 has had a long and illustrious history. This group of dedicated men and women, supported by an active Ladies Auxiliary, continues to play a vital role as they undertake numerous programs and missions which serve to benefit all veterans as well as the community.

Accomplishments include raising funds for charities, helping hospitalized vets and decorating graves of fellow veterans at Monmouth County cemeteries on Memorial Day. The JWV continues to ...
have an active involvement with Troop 71, Boy Scouts of America, and annually attend several Memorial Day services. Additionally, they will be sponsoring a job fair for veterans at Brookdale Community College on August 27.

On Tuesday, November 13 at 7:15pm at the old Oakhurst School Auditorium, 163 Monmouth Road, a panel of six JWV members who served in World War II, the Korean conflict and the Vietnam War tell about their experiences in a guided interview format.

Marie Curtis will serve as moderator for the program. Ample time will also be allotted for a question and answer session with the audience.

The presentation is open to the public free of charge, however donations are always appreciated. Also, refreshments will be served. Please bring a non-perishable item for the FoodBank of Monmouth and Ocean Counties.

Exhibits, Holiday Boutique and Bakery - "Home for the Holidays - 1945"



Museum transformed for two days

At no time were the separation and sacrifices of World War II more acutely felt than at Christmas. In the four years—from the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor to the surrender of Japanese forces in August 1945, the country struggled to keep the spirit of season alive despite shortages, uncertainties, and missing loved ones.

Imagine then, the joy of the first post-war Christmas celebrations. Better yet, join us the first weekend of December when the Woolley House is t...
ransformed to tell the story of “Home for Holidays, 1945.”

For two days, 11 to 4, Saturday and Sunday, December 1 and 2, the Museum becomes a stage for telling the story of the local homefront and recreating the joy of Christmas and Hanukkah, 1945.

It was an extraordinary time in our history. At war’s end, the U.S. government went to heroic lengths to get GIs so long separated from loved ones home for the holidays. “Operation Magic Carpet” returned tens of thousands of GIs from Europe and Asia. “Operation Santa Claus” expedited their discharge.

Veterans filled the airports and train and bus stations to overflowing in their rush to get home. Strangers hosted stranded veterans. Neighbors reached out to those who had lost loved ones. For the first time in years, goods and materials once needed to supply the warfront were available on the homefront.

Hanukkah, 1945, fell early and was celebrated on November 29. It held special significance for families in light of the horrors of the Holocaust.

The holidays of 1945 were an unprecedented and perhaps unmatched time of celebration, gratitude, and joy. Housing shortages, unemployment, labor strife, and civil injustices faced the nation. But for a few days, the country could put its challenges aside and rejoice in the war’s end and the return of loved ones.

Our “Home for the Holidays” weekend captures the spirit.

- A mini-exhibit contrasts the bitter-sweet war year holidays with the exhuberance of 1945.

- War-era model trains, doll houses, and toys fill the Our Town Gallery

- The Ocean Township Garden Club fills the Woolley House porch with freshly made wreaths and swags

- A Holiday Shop and Bakery--filled with one-of-a-kind, handmade crafts (perfect for gift-giving) and homemade goodies to eat and share--take over the Hearth and Home Gallery.

- There’s a “Santa Hunt” for the kids, caroling by the Ocean Township Choir at 2 on Sunday, walking tours of the Museum grounds Saturday and Sunday, and, as always, the drawing of the winning quilt raffle ticket Sunday at 3.

“Home for the Holidays” is another in the Museum’s series of exhibits and programs exploring the World War II homefront. Our major exhibit, “Loved Ones Go to War: Local Stories of World War II” forms a backdrop for this two-day event.

Start the celebration of this year’s holiday with a visit to the remarkable season of 1945. Consider holiday shopping for locally crafted, hand-made gifts from our Holiday Shop.

Please join us.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Remembering Our World War II Veterans

 
We wanted to let everyone know that there will NOT be a flag ceremony this coming Friday, September 14, 2012. We had kept this date in the event of the need to cancel any date due to weather, but we have been fortunate that we have not had to re-schedule any dates.
Please come out on Friday September 21, 2012 at 6:30 pm. At that time we will be honoring the deceased war veterans of the Wanamassa Fire Department (some 56 members) who have served their Country when the need arose. A list of the veterans being honored can be found at http://www.oceanmuseum.org/WorldWarIIVeteransRemembered9-21.html
The Wanamassa Fire Department will be present along with their Color Guard to perform the ceremony. As always, the Museum will be open for all who wish to come in and see the exhibits, including, Loved Ones Go To War: Local Stories of World War II.
In addition, we will be honoring other veterans weekly, on Friday evenings at 6:30 pm until Friday, December 7, 2012.
Thank You;
Township of Ocean Historical Museum
For more information. keep in touch with us at:


Tuesday, September 4, 2012

2012 Ghost Walk

Sunday October 21, 2012 at 5:30 pm
(Raindate - Sunday October 28, 2012 at 5:30pm)
Eden Woolley House, 703 Deal Road, Ocean, NJ 07712​

It will be all treats and no tricks as the Ocean Township Library’s Turner Gallery is transformed into a former Asbury Park USO building for a simulated “Camp Show” broadcast, circa 1944, on radio station WCAP—the Wonderful City of Asbury Park!

Mrs. Phoebe Woolley, 18th century matriarch of the Woolley family, has once again invited spectral guests from the Township’s past to help celebrate her 280th birthday this Halloween! Mrs. Woolley is the wife of Mr. Thomas Woolley Jr., of whom began construction on ... the Eden Woolley House in 1747. Many otherworldly apparitions have accepted her invitation and are in the midst of planning a festive occasion! They will regale visitors with their tales of old, and celebrate with a “spirited” USO style show, complete with music, entertainment, and refreshments!

Join us as we listen and sing along to popular songs from the WWII era performed by Gilda Healy and Barry Rosensweig, volunteers from Brookdale Community College’s Center for WWII Studies and Conflict Resolution. A dance team from the Fred Astaire Dance Studio of Manasquan will put us “In the Mood”, swing-style. A popular comedy routine, advertisements and station identifications will evoke the spirit of old-time radio, all in an intimate performance space. Members of the New Jersey Antique Radio Club, Info Age (at the former Camp Evans site) are lending their classic radios as well as their expertise in order to make this a memorable evening that is sure to delight youngsters as well as the young at heart.

Call the Museum 732-531-2136 to reserve a spot. Adults $7, children $3.   (Raindate - Sunday October 28, 2012 at 5:30pm)

Saturday, August 25, 2012

Election Memorabilia: The Stuff of American Campaigning

 
A new exhibit opens Sunday, September 9, in the Our Town Gallery of the Woolley House—just in time for the high-stakes months of the Presidential Campaign. The exhibit, “Election Memorabilia: The Stuff of American Campaigning,” showcases an impressive collection of political campaign buttons, banners, signs, photos, and news clippings. The artifacts ,both Republican and Democratic, include material from our own collection (a gift from the Mullaney family) and loaned items from local collectors.
 
It’s no surprise that the stuff of American political campaigning is colorful.  Consider the characters it represents. From our first President to our current, slogans, buttons, ads, and bumper stickers vie to tell a candidate’s story and win votes.
 
Here are just few fun facts:
 
•  Even the father of our country wore a campaign button. His was a brass, sewn to his coat, and read “Long Live the President.”
 
•  William Henry Harriso
n was the first to run an “image” Presidential campaign (1840). Though born rich, he chose the log cabin as his logo and coined what may be the first Presidential
political slogan, the famous “Tippecanoe and Tyler, too.”
 
•  The campaign button sums up the candidate in a few words. Remember “I like Ike?” Jimmy Carter’s went one step further. It had no words at all, just a golden peanut!
 
From the start, American campaigning has been rough and tumble and this exhibit captures the fun and fight of the contest. It’s a window into the history of campaigning. It’s an overview of the election process from local contests to the selection of President. Perfect for adults and children (who will be hearing a lot about elections this campaign season), it’s one more good reason to visit the Eden Woolley House.
 
“Election Memorabilia: The Stuff of American Campaigning” runs through the end of November.

Loved Ones Go to War: Local Stories of World War II​

 
Some days change everything. We think of September 11, 2001. The exhibit opening in June in the Richmond Gallery of the Woolley House asks us to consider another. On December 7, 1941, hundreds of Japanese planes attacked the American naval base at Pearl Harbor, destroying 20 ships and nearly 200 planes, killing more than 2,000 American sailors and soldiers, and wounding another 1,000. The country was at war, and overnight, everything changed.
 
The new exhibit, Loved Ones Go to War: Local Stories of World War II, highlights the impact of the war on a sampling of local veterans and those they left behind. The stories are taken from a global range of war experiences—from the Pacific campaign and European Theater; from the Navy, Marines, Army, and Army Air Corps; from combat and support services; from officers and enlisted men.
The exhibit draws a striking contrast to recent wars, which can seem distant and detached. It makes clear that no one—not those who fought, not their loved ones—was untouched by the challenges, sacrifices, risks, and tragedies of the world war.
 
Consider:
 
- An estimated 10 million men and women—from a U.S. population of 132 million—enlisted or were drafted into the military to fight World War II. (Contrast that to the estimated 1.5 million—from a population of 313 million—on active duty today.) In effect, every American household had a relative, friend, or neighbor in the service and in harm’s way.
 
- By the end of the war, more than 400,000 American military were dead and another 600,000, wounded.
 
- Almost overnight, the U.S. economy transformed into a war material supply line. The needs of the military came first, and basic commodities—like sugar, flour, milk, and gasoline—were in scarce supply to American families. Rationing became a way of life. Victory gardens sprang up in backyards and public spaces.
 
Women went to work in record numbers to fill jobs vacated by men at war. Civilians were trained to spot enemy aircraft, scan the horizon for German submarines, and patrol utility plants. Here in Asbury Park, blackout drapes along the boardwalk prevented enemy subs from using coastal lights to silhouette and target passing ships.
 
The new exhibit brings the story home. The veterans it highlights are the “boys next door.” Their stories are tales of patriotism, sacrifice, and danger. They are also tales of the families and communities who stayed behind—awaiting word from loved ones, coping with the fears, losses, and demands of the war. The stories inspire compassion and respect. Some are heroic, others touch us for their simple humanity. All offer fascinating insight into our national character more than a half a century ago.
 
Come see for yourself. Check the website oceanmuseum.org for details on the exhibit opening.
 
The Museum's hours are:
 
Tuesdays - 1:00 to 4:00 P.M.
Wednesdays - 1:00 to 4:00 P.M.
Thursdays - 1:00 to 4:00 P.M.
Thursdays - 7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.
Sundays - First and Second Sunday of the month 1:00 to 4:00

Friday, May 25, 2012

Families of World War II Veterans - Friday Flag Raisings


 
In conjunction with the new exhibit opening July 1, 2012, “Loved Ones Go to War: Local Stories of World War II,” the Museum is honoring deceased local World War II veterans with a flag raising ceremony each week from June 15 to December 7, 2012.

Every Friday at 6:30 p.m., a new flag will be raised at the Eden Woolley House and fly in honor of that week's veteran. The flag can be provided by the family or the Museum.

Local Boy Scouts will officiate over the raising and lowering of the flags. A sign in front of the flag pole will give information about the veteran being honored. The family and the public are welcome.

Call the Museum at 732-531-2136 to raise the flag for your loved one.

Monday, April 30, 2012

Spirit of the Jerseys State History Fair - Saturday May 12, 2012 - 11:00 am, Titusville, NJ



This year, the Township of Ocean Historical Museum will be making its second appearance at the “Spirit of the Jerseys” State History Fair at Washington’s Crossing State Park in Titusville, NJ. Join us at our tent and browse the collection of treasured artifacts from our township’s past. Our museum store will be at the fair offering various museum wares from books to t-shirts.

Volunteers will be... on hand to illustrate the township's history, as well as demonstrate crafts such as spinning, weaving, and old fashioned children's toys & games. Mrs. Phoebe Woolley will regale visitors with stories and songs from the 18th Century on her folk harp.

The “Spirit of the Jerseys” State History Fair started as an event commemorating the 100th anniversary of New Jersey's state owned historic sites. Its purpose is to cultivate the public's awareness and appreciation of NJ's historic resources by providing visitors with the opportunity to experience history in a fun and engaging manner. 2012 marks the 8th year of the fair, and annual attendance has averaged 5,000 visitors. Last year over 130 exhibitors participated in the event, including the Township of Ocean Historical Museum!

This year’s fair will include a juried Art Show, Antiques Appraisals, a colonial magic show, and more! Each year the Fair attracts exhibitors from all around the Garden State. The State History Fair is a fun-filled adventure into New Jersey's past that is appropriate for all ages.

Date: Saturday, May 12th, 2012

Where: Washington’s Crossing State Park in Titusville, NJ.

Time: 11am to 5pm. Rain or Shine!

Admission: Free (parking is $5 per car)

For more information, visit the NJ State History Fair’s website at:

http://www.state.nj.us/dep/parksandforests/historic/centennial/fairindex.htm

See you at the fair!
 
For more information, check with us at:
 


Sunday, April 29, 2012

Spring Speaker Event - 75th Anniversary of the Hindenburg Disaster - May 8, 2012, 7:15 pm


Spring Speaker Event - 75th Anniversary of the Hindenburg Disaster
May 8, 2012, 7:15 pm
Old Oakhurst School Auditorium, 163 Monmouth Road, Oakhurst, NJ 07755

Four times larger than the Goodyear blimp, the German airship Hindenburg was described by its designer, Hugo Eckener as “. . . a fabulous silvery fish, floating quietly in the ocean of air . . .”
The grandest of all airships carried its wealthy travelers in splendor.  (Famous passengers on previous trips included a young Nelson Rockefeller, actor Douglas Fairbanks and German world-heavyweight boxing champion Max Schmeling.)

A one-way ticket cost $400, about the price of a small car in those days.  Passenger staterooms included sinks, with a shower available.  An observation deck provided a spectacular view.  The kitchen was stocked with the finest foods, which were enjoyed in an elegant dining room.  There was a dance floor with a band stage, and a baby grand piano adorned the lounge.  There was even a smoking room!

Anyone alive during the late 1930’s will never forget the fiery nighttime crash of the Hindenburg at Lakehurst Naval Air Station May 6, 1937.  The now famous narrated newsreel of the fatal flight elicited gasps and screams from horrified movie audiences.  This tragic event signaled the death knell for dirigible travel.   

On Tuesday, May 8 at 7:15 pm at the Old Oakhurst School auditorium, 163 Monmouth Road, Oakhurst, Navy Lakehurst Historical Society president Carl Jablonski will conduct a program detailing this moment in history and provide an overview of WWII and Cold War era airship operations.  Information about the Joint Base—McGuire, Dix, and Lakehurst will also be featured.  Hindenburg photos and artifacts will be displayed.

Open to the public free of charge.  (Donations are welcome.)  Refreshments will be served. 


For more information, check with us at:
 

Monday, April 23, 2012

Weekend in Old Monmouth - Sat, May 5, 2012 - 10:00 am - 5:00pm; Sun May 6, 2012 - 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm


Eden Woolley House, 703 Deal Road, Ocean, NJ 07712

Also this Weekend At The Eden Woolley House -

- "The Return of Dracula" - the film classic starring Norma Eberhardt, Sat., May 5th, 1:30 pm and Sun. May 6th, 1:30pm

- Tours of the Stucile Farm Property

- Opening of the Norma Eberhardt Art Show, Terner Gallery, Ocean Township Library (Sun. May 6th, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm)

FREEHOLD, NJ ––““Weekend in Old Monmouth”” returns again with 40 historic sites throughout Monmouth County opening their doors to visitors interested in local history. Hours for most sites are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, May 5 and from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, May 6.

It's time to take a visit to over 40 historic Monmouth County sites, that illustrate a piece of local history These independent and local historic sites are generally operated independently of one another, but this special tour project synchronizes the hours of operation so history buffs can walk or drive to many of the county’s richest historic places and enjoy them in the spring. Visitors may see the places in any order or no order at all. You can start planning your route by previewing the tour sites on the county’s Web site at www.visitmonmouth.com. There is a detailed tour book and tour map available on the Web site. On the tour dates there are maps and booklets available at each tour stop If you have questions, please e-mail Executive Director, Randall Gabrielan, rgabriel@co.monmouth.nj.us or monmouthhistory@comcast.net
For more information, check out:

Our web site: http://www.OceanMuseum.org
Our Facebook Page: http://www.Facebook.com/OceanMuseum
Our Twitter Page: http://twitter.com/OceanMuseum
Our Blogspot page: http://OceanMuseum.blogspot.com
Our LinkedIn page: http://www.linkedin.com/company/Township-of-Ocean-Historical-Museum

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Living the History at the Eden Woolley House - Thurs. March 22, 2012 - 7:30pm


Join us on Thursday, March 22nd at 7:30 pm for a special workshop on "Living the History at the Township of Ocean Museum". The workshop is open to anyone of all ages interested in this unique medium used to enhance our museum's historical programs as well as enlighten visitors with costumed demonstrations and performances. The workshop will be conducted by Heather Mac Donald, a veteran historical interpreter of 15 years and volunteer with the Township of Ocean Museum. Included in this workshop will be topics such as becoming a historical figure or storyteller for our museum, and most importantly, dressing the part!

Keep in touch with us at:

Our Facebook Page: http://www.Facebook.com/OceanMuseum
Our Twitter Page: http://twitter.com/OceanMuseum
Our Blogspot page: http://OceanMuseum.blogspot.com
Our LinkedIn page: http://www.linkedin.com/company/Township-of-Ocean-Historical-Museum

Thursday, March 15, 2012

8th Annual Spring Tea - Saturday April 28, 2012 at 2:00 pm.

 
The Annual Spring Tea will take place on Saturday, April 28th from 2:00 pm until 4:00 pm. Seating will begin at 1:30 pm. The Tea will be held at the West Park Recreation Center in Oakhurst. Tickets are $20.00 and are available now. For tickets call the Museum at (732) 531...-2136. Tickets can be bought singly, but preferably as tables of 4 and 8.

All food is prepared by Museum volunteers and includes: tea sandwiches, breads, desserts and scones with whipped cream, butter and jam along with a variety of teas. There will be a gift auction, a boutique of hand quilted crafts and doll clothes, and entertainment. Prizes will be awarded for a fancy hat contest, so plan on wearing a hat.

ALL TICKETS MUST BE PURCHASED IN ADVANCE. EVERY YEAR IS A SELL OUT SO DON'T WAIT TO GET YOUR TICKETS.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Takanassee, Lifesaving and Shipwrecks at the Jersey Shore - Tuesday March 6, 2012, 7:15 pm


Winter Speaker Event - Takanassee, Lifesaving and Shipwrecks at the Jersey Shore - Tuesday March 6, 2012, 7:15 pm - Old Oakhurst School Auditorium

In centuries past, New Jersey was the mariner’s nightmare—arguably the deadliest coast in the world. It is said that if all the ships wrecked along its expanse were laid end to end, the string of sunken hulls would stretch from Sandy Hook t...o Cape May. A deadly combination of shallow and shifting shoals, strong in-shore currents, heavy ship traffic, North Atlantic storms, and primitive navigational and weather forecasting tools together made the Jersey coast the “graveyard of the Atlantic.”

An appeal for help came from a NJ Congressman William Newell (later governor). At his urging, the federal government appropriated funds to establish life-saving stations along the coast. The first federally-equipped station was built at Sandy Hook. Not long after, another was set up at Takanassee beach in Long Branch. The three distinctive buildings that still stand at Takanassee beach were part of the U.S. Life-Saving Service, created in 1848 in response to the alarming loss of life and property from ships wrecked off our shores.

In 1915, the Life-Saving Service merged with the Revenue Cutter Service to form the U.S. Coast Guard, and Guardsmen continued for decades to operate out of Takanassee. The stations were deactivated in 1928 by the Coast Guard, and the site eventually became the Takanassee Beach Club.

Local historians Dr. Richard Fernicola and Jim Foley lent artifacts as well as their expertise to the current Township of Ocean Historical Museum exhibit, Shipwrecks, Life-Saving, and the Story of Takanassee. This fascinating tale of the treacherous nature of early sea travel, New Jerseys’ role in the country’s response and the heroism of Life Saving Station #5 is featured at the Eden Woolley House, 703 Deal Road, Ocean.

In conjunction with this exhibit, on Tuesday, March 6 at 7:15 pm at the Old Oakhurst School Auditorium, 163 Monmouth Road, Oakhurst, these popular guest speakers will bring to life engaging tales of tragic maritime wrecks, heroic deeds of early life-savers, as well as an update on the fate of the historic buildings of the former lifesaving station.

The program is open to the public free of charge. (Donations are welcome.) Refreshments will be served.

Township of Ocean Historical Museum

Keep in touch with us at:

Our web site: http://www.OceanMuseum.org/
Our Facebook Page: http://www.Facebook.com/OceanMuseum
Our Twitter Page: http://twitter.com/OceanMuseum
Our Blogspot page: http://OceanMuseum.blogspot.com/

Sunday, February 19, 2012

Friday, February 10, 2012

Heart of Gold (and Silver) Fundraiser - Continued



Well our Heart of Gold Fundraiser was a rousing success. In fact, Earth Treasures has offered to extend the Fundraiser for a week at its store in Eatontown. Earth Treasures, will buy your unwanted gold and other precious metals. They will donate a percentage of their profit to support the Museum. You can exchange gold, platinum and silver jewelry. Earth Treasures will also buy silver place settings, candlesticks, trays etc.

If you were not able to make it to the event last night, you may still be able to trade in your gold silver or platinum and help the Museum at the same time. Go to Earth Treasures anytime up till next Saturday (February 18, 2012) and mention that you are there to help the Ocean Township Historical Museum, and they will not only give you the money for your jewelry, but a percentage will go the Museum as well.

Earth Treasures is located at:

Office Max Shopping Center
178 State Route 35 South
Eatontown, NJ 07724

(732) 542-5444

So, if you were not able to come last night, or if you came but forgot to bring something, there is still time to help.

Thank you for your support,

Township of Ocean Historical Museum
http://www.OceanMuseum.org

Thursday, January 19, 2012

A Tribute to Norma Eberhardt Duaphin


Our friend and founding member of the Township of Ocean Historical Museum, Norma Eberhardt Duaphin recently passed away. We will have a tribute to her and her film career at the Museum.


The Museum's hours are:


Tuesdays - 1:00 to 4:00 P.M.


Wednesdays - 1:00 to 4:00 P.M.


Thursdays - 1:00 to 4:00 P.M.


Thursdays - 7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.


Sundays - First and Second Sunday of the month 1:00 to 4:00 P.M.

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Shipwrecks, Life-Saving, and the Story of Takanassee


In centuries past, New Jersey was the mariner’s nightmare—arguably the deadliest coast in the world. It is said that if all the ships wrecked along its expanse were laid end to end, the string of sunken hulls would stretch from Sandy Hook to Cape May. A deadly combination of shallow and shifting shoals, strong in-shore currents, heavy ship traffic, North Atlantic storms, and primitive navigational and weather forecasting tools together made the Jersey coast the “graveyard of the Atlantic.”

An appeal for help came from a NJ Congressman William Newell (later governor). At his urging, the federal government appropriated funds to establish life-saving stations along the coast. The first federally-equipped station was built at Sandy Hook. Not long after, another was set up at Takanassee beach in Long Branch.

The three distinctive buildings that still stand at Takanassee beach were part of the U.S. Life-Saving Service, created in 1848 in response to the alarming loss of life and property from ships wrecked off our shores.

In 1915, the Life-Saving Service merged with the Revenue Cutter Service to form the U.S. Coast Guard, and Guardsmen continued for decades to operate out of Takanassee. The stations were deactivated in 1928 by the Coast Guard, and the site eventually became the Takanassee Beach Club.

Local historians Dr. Richard Fernicola and Jim Foley lent artifacts as well as their expertise to the current Township of Ocean Historical Museum exhibit, Shipwrecks, Life-Saving, and the Story of Takanassee. This fascinating tale of the treacherous nature of early sea travel, New Jerseys’ role in the country’s response and the heroism of Life Saving Station #5 is featured at the Eden Woolley House, 703 Deal Road, Ocean.

In conjunction with this exhibit, on Tuesday, March 6 at 7:15 pm at the Old Oakhurst School Auditorium, 163 Monmouth Road, Oakhurst, these popular guest speakers will bring to life engaging tales of tragic maritime wrecks, heroic deeds of early life-savers, as well as an update on the fate of the historic buildings of the former lifesaving station.

The program is open to the public free of charge. (Donations are welcome.) Refreshments will be served.